Architecture

Different types of Architecture using angular shapes and ancient crown formations

Arches

Typical Arch Shape Typical arch shape  A typical Arch Shape with a central Keystone is designed as an ornamental architectural element, and has load-bearing functions on both ends. The load-bearing is emphasized and placed on both ends of the Arch, on the Impost, keeping the Semi Circular hollow structure in place. A hollowed arcade is composed of a series of arches that have well-defined columns made of semi-circular hollow spheres cavities.
A Central Arch Shape centered arch A Central arch is an arch found in the front entrance of buildings which has been walled and filled with solid construction so it can serve as a passageway, door, or window. The term is most often associated with masonry wall construction, but is also found (or simulated) in other types of construction such as light frame construction. Some Open Central arches were originally built as open arches leading into garden hallways with  intermediate distances in between separately wall-filled at a later date. Others were originally built with hollow Arch and a central Keystone to re-enforce the entrance of the buildings creating a basilica Napoleonic and intentional stylistic elements.

The two edges are constructed with an intention to considerably support weight bearing frames/beams which are pre-determined by the number of stories or height, depth and width of the structure or building.

Arc De Triomphe de I’Etoile The Arc de Triomphe de l’Étoile, (Arch of Triumph of the Star) is one of the most famous monuments in Paris. It stands in the centre of the Place Charles de Gaulle (originally named Place de l’Étoile), at the western end of the Champs-Élysées. It should not be confused with a smaller arch, the Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel, which stands west of the Louvre. The Arc de Triomphe (in English: “Triumphal Arch”) honours those who fought and died for France in the French Revolutionary and the Napoleonic Wars, with the names of all French victories and generals inscribed on its inner and outer surfaces. Beneath its vault lies the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier from World War I.

 

The Arc de Triomphe is the linchpin of the Axe historique (historic axis) – a sequence of monuments and grand thoroughfares on a route which runs from the courtyard of the Louvre to the Grande Arche de la Défense. The monument was designed by Jean Chalgrin in 1806 and its iconographic program pitted heroically nude French youths against bearded Germanic warriors in chain mail. It set the tone for public monuments, with triumphant patriotic messages. 

The monument stands 50 metres (164 ft) in height, 45 m (148 ft) wide and 22 m (72 ft) deep. The large vault is 29.19 m (95.8 ft) high and 14.62 m (48.0 ft) wide. The small vault is 18.68 m (61.3 ft) high and 8.44 m (27.7 ft) wide. Its design was inspired by the Roman Arch of Titus. The Arc de Triomphe is built on such a large scale that, three weeks after the Paris victory parade in 1919 (marking the end of hostilities in World War I), Charles Godefroy flew his Nieuport biplane through it, with the event captured on news. 

It was the tallest triumphal arch in existence until the completion of the Monumento a la Revolución in Mexico City in 1938, which is 67 metres (220 ft) high. The Arch of Triumph in Pyongyang, completed in 1982, is modeled on the Arc de Triomphe and is slightly taller at 60 m (197 ft).

Blind Arcade LinKoping cathedral in Sweden A blind arcade is an arcade that is composed of a series of arches that has no actual openings and that is applied to the surface of a wall as a decorative element: i.e. the arches are not windows or openings but are part of the masonry face. It is designed as an ornamental architectural element, and has no load-bearing function. Whereas a blind arch is usually a single arch or a series of joined arches as a frieze (sometimes called Lombard bands), a blind arcade is composed of a series of arches that have well-defined columns.
Blind Arch blind archBlind Arcade A blind arch is an arch found in the wall of a building which has been infilled with solid construction so it cannot serve as a passageway, door, or window. The term is most often associated with masonry wall construction, but is also found (or simulated) in other types of construction such as light frame construction. Some blind arches were originally built as open arches and infilled at a later date. Others were originally built with solid infill as intentional stylistic elements.

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